Wednesday, 8 May 2013

Open Ended Materials

Open-ended means not having a fixed answer; unrestricted. The children themselves decide what to do, how to do it, and what to use.

These are objects that have many uses and endless possibilities. There are no exceptions, no specific problems to solve, no rules to follow, and no pressure to produce a finished project. It's about FREE PLAY!

Why are open-ended materials important to include in children's play?

  • allows children to use their imagination and creativity
  • helps develop trial and error and problem solving skills
  • children have no fear of doing it wrong since there is no right method or outcome.
  • open-ended play gives children a sense of freedom and self confidence
  • they must make their own choices and learn to be responsible and self-directed.
"IMAGINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN KNOWLEDGE" - Albert Einstein

The following activities are NOT open-ended:
  • ready made cut outs,shapes, or craft kits
  • traced drawings for children to color
  • coloring books
  • stencils
  • dot-to-dot drawings
  • puzzles and board games
  • toys with batteries- 90% toy, 10% child
  • television and videos
  • toys with only one purpose or use
  • costumes with one specific use only- Halloween costumes

List of Open-Ended materials to use often in your program planning: (use with direct supervision)

Cardboard tubes
Shoelaces
Styrofoam packing
Wood scraps
Yarn
Metal juice can lids
Paint-watercolor, tempera, acrylic
Jewels from old lamps and chandeliers
Clay
Old costume jewelry
Sand
Wine corks
Mud
Empty spools of thread
Water
Lace
Blocks
Textured paper
Lego
Hemp
Plastic caps from milk jugs, bottle caps
Ribbon
Fabric pieces – felt squares
Pipe cleaners
Cardboard boxes of various sizes
All kinds of tape
Play dough
Toothpicks
Crayons
Googly eyes
Markers
String
Paper
Chopsticks
Buttons
Recycled water bottles/cans
Pom poms
Old metal keys
Empty cereal boxes
Parts from machines, clocks, engines
Paper bags – grocery and lunch bags
Hats, shoes, belts, bags, shirts, gloves
Newspaper and flyers
Scarves and bandanas
Shoe boxes
Colored, clean aquarium rocks
Bread tags
Artificial flowers and petals
Q-tips
Laundry soap lids
Straws of different colors and sizes
Leaves
Aluminum foil
Branches
Golf T’s
Seeds
Plastic food containers with lids
Sea shells
Empty ice cream buckets
Dirt
Dice of all sizes
Sand
Poker chips
Gravel
Magnets
Rocks
Paper clips
Mud
Marbles
Water
Glass gems
Snow
Sequins
Tree cookies – stumps cut up into discs
Clothespins
Pine cones
PVC pipe
Moss
Sponges
Pussy Willows
Nuts and bolts from a hardware store
Bulrushes – Cattails
Beads of various sizes
Twigs
                                          THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!

7 comments:

  1. A very interesting read and a great post alltogether. thanks for sharing this information.

    Child Care Services

    ReplyDelete
  2. Articles on this website tend to be good and appreciative.

    Child Care Rebate & Child Care Centre Carlingford

    ReplyDelete
  3. I’m going to read this. I’ll be sure to come back. thanks for sharing. and also This article gives the light in which we can observe the reality. this is very nice one and gives indepth information. thanks for this nice article... industrial cleaner perth

    ReplyDelete
  4. so happy to find good place to many here in the post, the writing is just great, thanks for the post. industrial cleaner perth

    ReplyDelete
  5. Reading Makes Your Child Smarter

    Reading is known to have numerous benefits. It increases your world knowledge, enhances your vocabulary, and works to improve your reading comprehension abilities.

    But did you know that reading can actually make you smarter?

    In fact, reading not only can make a child smarter, the very act of reading can even help to compensate for modest levels of cognitive ability in children by building their vocabulary and general knowledge! This is a finding reported by researchers Cunningham and Stanovich in a report titled "What Reading Does For the Mind".

    The simple fact here is that reading can make your child smarter, and that learning to read early on is directly linked to later success in life.

    1) Did you know that your child's vocabulary at 3 years old predicts his or her grade one reading success? [1]

    2) Did you know that vocabulary and reading ability in first grade strongly predicts grade 11 outcomes? [2]

    3) Did you know that your child's reading skill in grade 3 directly influences high school graduation? Studies have found that children who cannot read proficiently by grade 3 are four times more likely to leave school without a diploma than proficient readers! [3]

    >> Give your child the best possible head start. Teach your child to read today. Click here to learn how.

    But how do you teach a young child to read, and isn't that the job of the school and teachers?

    You can't be more wrong...

    With the right tools, knowledge, and techniques, teaching young children to read can be a simple and effective process. I'd like to introduce you to a fantastic reading program called Children Learning Reading, a super effective method for teaching children to read - even children as young as just 2 or 3 years old.

    The creators of this program have used it to teach their four children to read before age 3, and by reading, I mean real, phonetic reading.

    I can understand if you find that hard to believe... In fact, I had a difficult time believing it myself as well... that is, until I saw the videos they posted documenting the reading progress of the their children - not to mention all the videos other parents have sent in showcasing their children's reading progress after using the Children Learning Program. After learning more about their methods and techniques, it became clear how it's possible to teach young children to read effectively.

    It is truly within your ability to teach your child to read in a relatively short period of time spending just 10 to 15 minutes each day.

    >> Click here now to watch the videos and start teaching your child to read.

    1. Vocabulary Development and Instruction: A Prerequisite for School Learning
    Andrew Biemiller, University of Toronto

    2. Early reading acquisition and its relation to reading experience and ability 10 years later.
    Cunningham AE, Stanovich KE.

    3. Double Jeopardy How Third-Grade Reading Skills and Poverty Influence High School Graduation
    Donald J. Hernandez, Hunter College and the Graduate Center,

    ReplyDelete
  6. This website and I conceive this internet site is really informative ! Keep on putting up! cleaningedge

    ReplyDelete
  7. Very nice article. I enjoyed reading your post. very nice share. I want to twit this to my followers. Thanks !. industrial cleaner perth

    ReplyDelete